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Tamasya di Istanbul

Mosque
“İstanbul's most photogenic building was the grand project of Sultan Ahmet I (r 1603–17), whose tomb is located on the north side of the site facing Sultanahmet Park. The mosque's wonderfully curvaceous exterior features a cascade of domes and six slender minarets. Blue İznik tiles adorn the interior and give the building its unofficial but commonly used name. With the mosque's exterior, the architect, Sedefkâr Mehmet Ağa, managed to orchestrate a visual wham-bam effect similar to that of nearby star Aya Sofya's interior. Its curves are voluptuous; it has six minarets (more than any other mosque at the time it was built); and its courtyard is the biggest of all of the Ottoman mosques. The interior has a similarly grand scale: the İznik tiles number in the tens of thousands; there are 260 windows; and the central prayer space is huge. To best grasp the mosque's design, enter the complex via the Hippodrome rather than from Sultanahmet Park. Once inside the courtyard, which is the same size as the mosque's interior, you'll appreciate the building's perfect proportions. The mosque is such a popular attraction that admission is controlled in order to preserve its sacred atmosphere. Only worshippers are admitted through the main door; visitors must use the south door (follow the signs). The mosque is closed to nonworshippers during the six daily prayer times: two hours before dawn, dawn, midday, afternoon, sunset and right before the last light of the day.”
112rekomendasi lokal
Situs Bersejarah
“The colourful and chaotic Grand Bazaar is the heart of İstanbul's Old City and has been so for centuries. Starting as a small vaulted bedesten (warehouse) built by order of Mehmet the Conqueror in 1461, it grew to cover a vast area as lanes between the bedesten, neighbouring shops and hans (caravanserais) were roofed and the market assumed the sprawling, labyrinthine form that it retains today.When here, be sure to peep through doorways to discover hidden hans, veer down narrow lanes to watch artisans at work and wander the main thoroughfares to differentiate treasures from tourist tack. It's obligatory to drink lots of tea, compare price after price and try your hand at the art of bargaining. Allow at least three hours for your visit; some travellers spend three days!”
124rekomendasi lokal
Situs Bersejarah
“Vividly coloured spices are displayed alongside jewel-like lokum (Turkish delight) at this Ottoman-era marketplace, providing eye candy for the thousands of tourists and locals who make their way here every day. Stalls also sell caviar, dried herbs, honey, nuts and dried fruits. The number of stalls selling tourist trinkets increases annually, yet this remains a great place to stock up on edible souvenirs, share a few jokes with vendors and marvel at the well-preserved building. The market was constructed in the 1660s as part of the New Mosque, with rent from the shops supporting the upkeep of the mosque as well as its charitable activities, which included a school, hamam and hospital. The market's Turkish name, the Mısır Çarşısı (Egyptian Market), references the fact that the building was initially endowed with taxes levied on goods imported from Egypt. In its heyday, the bazaar was the last stop for the camel caravans that travelled the Silk Road from China, India and Persia. On the west side of the market there are outdoor produce stalls selling fresh foodstuff from all over Anatolia, including a wonderful selection of cheeses. Also here is the most famous coffee supplier in İstanbul, Kurukahveci Mehmet Efendi, established over 100 years ago. This is located on the corner of Hasırcılar Caddesi, which is full of shops selling food and kitchenware.”
91rekomendasi lokal
Situs Bersejarah
“This subterranean structure was commissioned by Emperor Justinian and built in 532. The largest surviving Byzantine cistern in İstanbul, it was constructed using 336 columns, many of which were salvaged from ruined temples and feature fine carved capitals. Its symmetry and sheer grandeur of conception are quite breathtaking, and its cavernous depths make a great retreat on summer days. Like most sites in İstanbul, the cistern has an unusual history. It was originally known as the Basilica Cistern because it lay underneath the Stoa Basilica, one of the great squares on the first hill. Designed to service the Great Palace and surrounding buildings, it was able to store up to 80,000 cu metres of water delivered via 20km of aqueducts from a reservoir near the Black Sea, but was closed when the Byzantine emperors relocated from the Great Palace. Forgotten by the city authorities some time before the Conquest, it wasn't rediscovered until 1545, when scholar Petrus Gyllius was researching Byzantine antiquities in the city and was told by local residents that they were able to obtain water by lowering buckets into a dark space below their basement floors. Some were even catching fish this way. Intrigued, Gyllius explored the neighbourhood and finally accessed the cistern through one of the basements. Even after his discovery, the Ottomans (who referred to the cistern as Yerebatan Saray) didn't treat the so-called Underground Palace with the respect it deserved – it became a dumping ground for all sorts of junk, as well as corpses. The cistern was cleaned and renovated in 1985 by the İstanbul Metropolitan Municipality and opened to the public in 1987. It's now one of the city's most popular tourist attractions. Walking along its raised wooden platforms, you'll feel water dripping from the vaulted ceiling and see schools of ghostly carp patrolling the water – it certainly has bucketloads of atmosphere.”
75rekomendasi lokal
Taman
“Gülhane Park (Turkish: Gülhane Parkı, "Rosehouse Park"; from Persian: گلخانه Gulkhāna, "house of flowers") is a historical urban park in the Eminönü district of Istanbul, Turkey; it is located adjacen”
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Situs Bersejarah
“The Grand Bazaar in Istanbul is one of the largest and oldest covered markets in the world, with 61 covered markets and over 3,000 shops which attract 250,000 and 400,000 visitors daily. ”
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Situs Bersejarah
“Hezarfen Ahmet Celebi was the first flying Turk during the Ottoman Empire of the 17th century. He copied bird wings and studied air flows, than jumping from the Galata Tower he overflew the Bosphorus and landed at Uskudar district on the Asian side, around 6 kilometers (4 miles) in distance.”
7rekomendasi lokal
Mosque
1rekomendasi lokal
Situs Bersejarah
“A tiny park with beautiful café for a weekend breakfast and a family of white ducks.”
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Kafe
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“You should visit Pierre Loti Hill, where French novalist Pierre Loti visit so often, drink a Turkish tea from top of Golden Horn To Marmara sea. Maybe you will get inspired for your first novel.”
9rekomendasi lokal
Situs Bersejarah
“Must see place, many restaurants, coffee shops, wine houses, local designer boutiques, Galata Tower and many more.”
5rekomendasi lokal
Mosque
“A small mosque,easily missed since it is surrounded by several larger mosques.it is close to the spice market.But, so well worth seeing,it is beautiful,being decorated from floor to ceiling with tiles”
7rekomendasi lokal
Situs Bersejarah
“Historic Mısır çarşısı where you can find all kinds of herbs and traditional sweets”
4rekomendasi lokal
Mal Belanja
“Historic Bazaar and shops and cafe and cafeteria for hookah... Just 3 münite”
4rekomendasi lokal
Situs Bersejarah
“The Column of Constantine also known as the Burnt Stone, is a Roman monumental column constructed on the orders of the Roman emperor Constantine the Great in 330 AD.”
4rekomendasi lokal
Situs Bersejarah
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“WHO SHOULD VISIT: This restaurant is inside a historical, huge urban park. Take a long walk, do some yoga under great trees and come here to enjoy your coffee and ice cream. If you feel hungry ; they have a rich menu including soups, breakfast, cold and hot starters, pastries etc..Prices are affordable. WHEN TO VISIT: Avoid the weekends. Families with their screaming children can make you feel lost.”
8rekomendasi lokal